Whiny College Students Demand Apology After Being Offended By A Cartoon

A Delaware university newspaper has been under assault by students who have taken offense to two cartoons that ran in the latest issue. The cartoons, which were created by a black student, have been deemed racially insensitive and have led students to call on school administrators to issue strict guidelines to prohibit similar forms of expression.

In one cartoon published in Wesley College's independent Whetstone newspaper, a black woman wearing a Black Lives Matter shirt says, “Would you look at the time... I'm late for my abortion.” The second cartoon features a garden tool saying, “Who is you calling a HOE!!!” to a man who apologizes, “I'm sorry ma'am, you just look like a HOE!”

To anyone with even a passing understanding of humor or current events, the cartoons seem to be nothing more than social commentary. Edgy? Certainly. Worthy of outrage? Obviously not; it's just a cartoon.

But to the whiny students of Wesley College, the cartoons have become a rallying point for special-snowflake millenials to argue over who was most triggered.

“I just feel like it's inappropriate, and it kind of offends me,” a freshman student told WBOC while presumably choking back tears and writing a Tumblr post. “I know that we have student events where students that aren't minorities feel let out and discriminated again and then something like this is just not OK to me.” 

That's right, you insensitive cartoonist, it's just not okay. How dare you deviate from safe space approved subjects? 

As you'd expect in today's world, a student coalition was formed to combat the First Amendment by channeling their group tantrum into a list of demands to force university President Robert Clark's hand. 

Among other ridiculous requests – “racial awareness and inclusion training” and hiring more mental health professionals as long as they are “of color” – the students insisted that “guidelines” be placed on the Whetstone to stop “demeaning content.” In other words, these students are demanding censorship.

President Clark, undoubtedly fearing the loss of his cushy job, sent out a groveling letter apologizing profusely for the cartoon, promising an “open dialogue” and warning other freedom of speech lovers that they “must take responsibility for the ideas and opinions that they express.” 

We can also assume that Clark himself tucked every student into bed that night, lest they have scary nightmares about their traumatic experience with a cartoon.

 

Source: WMDT