The World’s Oldest Beer Was Just Created Using Yeast From 220 Year-Old Shipwreck

For Today in the Break Brewmaster series we take a look at what might be the “world’s oldest beer.” While some of that skunky Natty Ice we drink for beer pong might taste like it came from the 18th century, one beer harvested from a 1797 shipwreck actually did.

Previously we have explored the world’s “strongest” beers, those with an extremely high alcohol content that punch you in the face along with their  delicious taste.

However, divers recently salvaged bottles of brew from the Historic Shipwreck Sydney Dover off the coast of Preservation Island in Tasmania. The Australian ship the Sydney Cove must have been delivering some beer for an epic party in the 1700’s. Sadly those brews never reached down under. However like that scene in Ghostbusters where the Titanic finally docks in New York Harbor, these beers will finally arrive in someone’s belly.

While wine preserved in shipwrecks has been consumed after hundreds of years, for the beer to be tried, an international team of scientists was convened. (Note: cancer still not cured.) Researchers from Australia, France, Germany and Belgium- an Avengers like taskforce from the world’s greatest beer brewing countries were worked at The Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery. There they extracted still living yeast from the 200 year old bottles.

According to the report, the beer has a light and fresh flavor.  Using historical beer brewing recipes the team used the old yeast to make a beer that has not been tasted by human mouths in centuries. The shipwreck also contains lots of goods from the 18th century that archeologists hope to study further. In a statement the group that made the old beer said:

“We will also study the wine and spirits from the cargo, possibly enabling the recreation of other historic brews.”

This whole hipster microbrew thing is really getting out of hand!

What is the strangest beer you have ever tried?

Follow Phil Haney on Twitter @PhilHaney