Spoiler Alert: New Star Wars Isn't Going To Be The Biggest Movie Of All Time

money

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" has not only perked major life into millions of movie fans globally, it has already broken numerous box office records. As of this writing (shortly before Christmas 2015), it seems very likely that it will eclipse “Avatar” as the highest grossing movie of all time.

all of it

You’re likely going to see or hear a story about how it is on its way to being the biggest movie of all time. We here at Break want you to know how to look at the numbers – plus, we’ve got a cool fact that could help you win a bet.

dance

It’s pretty  likely none of your friends will realize that it isn’t even going to be close to being the biggest movie of all time.

The 19 records it has already broken as of 12/23/15 are:

Opening Weekend

$247,966,675

Opening Weekend - Worldwide

$528,966,675

Holiday Opening

$247,966,675

December Opening

$247,966,675

Rated PG-13 Opening

$247,966,675

Top Opening Theater Average - Wide Release

$59,982

Top Theater Average - Wide Release

$59,982

Single Day

$119,119,282

Opening Day

$119,119,282

Friday Gross

$119,119,282

Sunday Gross

$60,553,189

Monday Gross

$40,109,742

Non-Holiday Monday

$40,109,742

3-Day Gross

$247,966,675

4-Day Gross

$288,076,417

Fastest to $100M

1 days

Fastest to $150M

2 days

Fastest to $200M

3 days

Fastest to $250M

4 days

 

So what is left for it to conquer? The seemingly two biggest of all: Domestic and Worldwide totals. “Avatar” holds them both, with $760,507,62 and $2,787,965,087 respectively.

avatar

This may all seem like Monopoly money, but let’s try to get some perspective on this, especially if you want to stump your friends as to “what was the biggest movie of all time?”

monopoly

The savvy ones will likely say its “Avatar,” and they’ll also probably know that the new Star Wars is quickly creeping up on it with its Jedi-like precision.

droids

However, the only way to compare grosses from different eras is to adjust for inflation. Obviously a new movie is making a lot more per ticket than an older one. So, adjusting for inflation, the record keeper is from 1939 and in modern dollars made over 1.7 billion domestically.

winner

Gone with the Wind may have “only” earned $198,000,000 or so, but that’s when tickets were much less expensive.

witness

Frankly my dear, we do give a damn.

damn

star gone

gone

Source: Box Office Mojo