These Graffiti Covered Piglets Are The Cutest Form of Vandalism You'll Ever See

DannyGallagher by DannyGallagher on Jul. 03, 2014

"Mankind never stoops quite so low as when it commits a crime against an animal," someone who's really smart and stuff probably said at some point in history. But a couple of "graffiti artists" in Baltimore, Maryland, ignored these wise words, presumably because cruelty to animals is one of the few laws that Baltimore hasn't had to deal with lately.

The vandals broke into a local petting zoo and tagged a sow and each of her 11 piglets. Luckily, the animals weren't harmed since they were sprayed with a safe, antiseptic spray the vandals found in a barn on the property.

Police and the petting zoo's owner suspect the perpetrators may have been trying to convey a message of some sort, although since local public high schoolers are probably involved, no one can decipher the spelling or grammar.

How do we know students committed the vandalism? Was it determined as the result of time-honored police tactics, like measuring the depth of the perpetrator's footprints to determine their height, or running a DNA sample from a stray hair they found in the paint?

No, the vandals spray painted "URBANA RULES" on a nearby sign, and Urbana is the name of a local school. Suddenly, our nation's low SAT scores and inability to compete with China makes a lot more sense. (Source)

5 comments
Grease-Monkey
Grease-Monkey User

Wow! Must be a slow day for Break if this is news. I did this for fun when I worked on the hog farm.

COHockey
COHockey User

Crimes against bacon are no laughing matter. 

LostKeys
LostKeys User

@COHockey Meh, this is nothing new. Tattoo artists pay a small fee to practice on pigs because their skin is the most similar to ours. 

mustangman6799
mustangman6799 User

@LostKeys   They should try chimpanzee skin.  I bet it's 95% similar.  I was going to say 98.5% but studies in 2002 have determined that our DNA is closer to 95% percent identical to chimps than the 98.5% calculated in the 70's.  Technology improved, the data was updated. That's just how it goes.