New Jersey Governor Chris Christie Spent $82,000 Of State Money On Food At Games

Right or wrong, everyone loves to burn New Jersey Governor Chris Christie over his weight issues and there is a slim chance that this news item is going to slow the roll on the fat jokes.  That’s because a new report details Gov. Christie’s spending habits from a state allowance that gives the governor $95,000 a year to use towards expenses (in addition to his salary of $175,000 a year). According to the Watchdog New Jersey report:

“Christie spent $360,000 from his state allowance during his five years in office. More than 80 percent of that money, or $300,000, was used to buy food, alcohol and desserts, according to a New Jersey Watchdog analysis of records released by the governor’s office.”

 

He’s a man who really likes to throw his weight around as Governor. $300,000 on food over five years works out to $60K a year for you math majors. However the really interesting part of the report is the amount he spent specifically at the concession stand for NFL games. I myself mainly go to sporting events to have an excuse to chow down on nachos, chilidogs and brewskies, so I have sympathy for the Governor if he went a little hog wild at MetLife Stadium where the New York Giants and Jets play. So how much did they say he spent between 2010 and 2011 on stuff like hotdogs, beer and peanuts?

“On 58 occasions, Christie used a debit card to pay a total of $82,594 to Delaware North Sportservice, which operates the concessions at MetLife. The governor’s office did not provide any receipts, business reasons or names of individuals entertained, but defended the expense.”

 

$82 grand on ballpark snacks! Either Gov. Christie loves to go nuts boozing and fooding it up at the game or the price of beer at ballparks is really getting out of hand! Was he getting football bottle service?

If you are a fan of Governor Christie or not, one thing is for certain; I think we would all love to watch a game with him!

Follow Phil Haney on Twitter @PhilHaney

Source: Watchdog.Org